How to Travel with Your Dog: Tips to Make the Most of Your Trip

Nearly everyone regrets not traveling with their family and friends. Many people consider the quarterly or annual trips to be the highlight of the year.

Even though it may seem impossible to travel far away from home, small road trips can still be fun, especially with your furry friend.

Not all dogs are keen to travel. These are some things you should consider before taking your dog on a trip.

Trip Agenda

It is possible to narrow down what you are looking to do and the places you would like to see while on vacation. Is your vacation a beach-friendly trip or a staycation? Are there boat rides? Or is it hiking and trekking?

You should consider bringing a suitable dog crate if you plan to take your dog on a trip that takes place in places your dog is not permitted.

Visit family and friends? It’s a good idea for you to inform your hosts that you will be bringing your dog with you. It will allow you to communicate with the hosts in case your dog is not friendly or has allergies. This allows you to be prepared for any eventualities, such as buying a harness that gives you more control and makes it easier to manage your dog, or giving your dog a groom before your trip to reduce shedding.

Although traveling with your dog can be fun and a great way for you to make memories, it’s sometimes better to leave your dog at home. This is especially true if your pet is elderly or anxious and cannot travel long distances in the car.

Your dog’s personality, behavior, and overall health

You should also consider your dog’s attitude towards pets and other dogs. Your pup will often be exploring new territory while on adventure. You might want to consider your dog’s reaction to strangers, whether they are human or animals, if your dog isn’t a seasoned traveler.

Are you able to walk your dog on a leash or does he pull you in the direction of his nose? Is your dog crate-trained or does he/she get stressed if they are kept in a crate long enough? Are they toilet-trained enough to wait for the command before he goes about his business? If your dog is going on a trip, you will need to be aware of any issues they may have with their digestion or bladder.

There are products that can relieve stress in dogs. You can also use pheromone-based sprays and treats to reduce anxiety. If necessary, sedatives may also be used.

Gear for Travel

Your dog needs to be dressed in the same way you plan your OOTD for travel photos. Attach a collar to your dog and a tag. Your contact information and your dog’s name must be on the tag. In the event of a lost or injured dog, tags are very useful. A scanner may not always be available, even if your dog has been microchipped. It helps to keep the microchip information up-to-date.

You can get more control with a harness that is comfortable for your dog if they pull.

A jacket may be necessary for dogs who are traveling to colder areas. There are many options for all-weather jackets, as well as lightweight thermal vests that can be used for hiking.

There are many car harnesses and car seat boosters available for dogs. You can also choose the one that best fits your vehicle.

Flying with your dog

Coordinate with the airline if your dog is going to fly by air. Different airlines have different requirements regarding paperwork and crate specifications.

Be aware that every country has its own requirements when traveling internationally. This could include obtaining health certificates, vaccinations, or being placed in quarantine on arrival.

Snacks

It can be just as much fun picking the snacks for a road trip as the trip itself. Our dogs may not be as adventurous as we humans. Bring food your dog is used to eating for meals. For long trips or camping, shelf-stable food such as kibble or air-dried foods are ideal. Single-serve trays can be used to provide light snacks and meals for small-breed pets.

To keep your dog’s food fresh and safe from pests, store it in an airtight container. You can find more useful tips on food storage in our article Benefits of Storage Containers.

Although it is a good idea to bring your dog’s food, it can be difficult for pet parents to resist those puppy dog eyes. Some foods that we eat are safe for our dogs, while others can be harmful. This guide will explain what foods your dog can eat and not eat.

Other Options

There are many things you can do to reduce stress for your dog if he isn’t ready to travel with you on your next trip.

Your pup can be cared for at home by a relative or friend, or you can take them to the relatives’ home. To make sure your pet’s stay is enjoyable for both you and your relatives, be sure to discuss the details and arrangements with them. If your pet is anxious, you can bring him food, toys, a bed, and other stress relief items.

A trusted pet sitter can be a great help. Your beloved pup will be able to stay at home, and not have to travel by car. There are many websites and apps that will help you find a pet-sitter, depending on where you live. Ask your family and friends for recommendations.

You can also drop your pet at a pet hotel, kennel or other facility. Many vet clinics also offer boarding services. There are many lodging options available at pet hotels, from basic kennels to luxury rooms.

We hope these tips will make it easier to enjoy your trip and to ensure that your dog is happy and healthy on the road.